The presence of evil as described in the article evil and omnipotence

God itself sets some very poor examples when it comes to parenting. What does this teach us? If our children do not turn out how we wished, then, we can follow the example of the perfectly just Christian Godand destroy them. And anything around them, including animals and other people.

The presence of evil as described in the article evil and omnipotence

References and Further Reading 1. Sources of Western Concepts of God Sources of western concepts of the divine have been threefold: Reported experiences of God are remarkably varied and have produced equally varied concepts of the divine being.

Experiences can be occasioned by something external and universally available, such as the starry sky, or by something external and private, such as a burning bush. Experiences can be internal and effable, such as a vision, or internal and ineffable, as is claimed by some mystics.

Revelation can be linked to religious experience or a type of it, both for the person originally receiving it and the one merely accepting it as authoritative.

Those who accept its authority typically regard it as a source of concepts of the divine that are more detailed and more accurate than could be obtained by other means.

Increasingly, the modern focus has been on the complexities of the process of interpretation philosophical hermeneutics and the extent to which it is necessarily subjective. Revelation can be intentionally unconnected to reason such that it is accepted on bare faith fideism; compare Kierkegaardor at the other extreme, can be grounded in reason in that it is accepted because and only insofar as it is reasonable compare Locke.

Reason has been taken as ancillary to religious experience and revelation, or on other accounts, as independent and the sole reliable source of concepts of God.

The presence of evil as described in the article evil and omnipotence

Each of the three sources of concepts of God has had those who regard it as the sole reliable basis of our idea of the divine. By contrast, others have regarded two or three of the sources as interdependent and mutually reinforcing.

Regardless of these differing approaches, theism broadly construed has been a dominant theme for much of the history of Western thought. Greeks At the dawn of philosophy, the Ionian Greeks sought to understand the true nature of the cosmos and its manifestations of both change and permanence.

To Heraclitusall was change and nothing endured, whereas to Parmenidesall change was apparent. The Pythagoreans found order and permanence in mathematics, giving it religious significance as ultimate being. The Stoics identified order with divine reason. To PlatoGod is transcendent-the highest and most perfect being-and one who uses eternal forms, or archetypes, to fashion a universe that is eternal and uncreated.

The order and purpose he gives the universe is limited by the imperfections inherent in material.

Western Concepts of God. Western concepts of God have ranged from the detached transcendent demiurge of Aristotle to the pantheism of Spinoza. Nevertheless, much of western thought about God has fallen within some broad form of theism. The problem of evil refers to the question of how to reconcile the existence of evil with an omnipotent, omnibenevolent and omniscient God (see theism). An argument from evil claims that because evil exists, either God does not exist or does not have all three of those properties. Attempts to show the contrary have traditionally been discussed under the heading of theodicy. Further, it might not match the nature of God as described by those who believe in Him. Specifically, Plantinga argues that free will provides a logically possible reason for an all-powerful, all-knowing, all-good God to allow the existence of moral evil. God’s omnipotence does not imply logical contradiction, such as making a square circle.

Flaws are therefore real and exist in the universe; they are not merely higher divine purposes misunderstood by humans. God is not the author of everything because some things are evil. We can infer that God is the author of the punishments of the wicked because those punishments benefit the wicked.

God, being good, is also unchangeable since any change would be for the worse. For Plato, this does not mean as some later Christian thought held that God is the ground of moral goodness; rather, whatever is good is good in an of itself.The Augustinian theodicy, named for the 4th- and 5th-century theologian, philosopher and (according to some Christian denominations) Saint Augustine of Hippo, is a type of Christian theodicy designed in response to the evidential problem of initiativeblog.com such, it attempts to explain the probability of an omnipotent (all-powerful) and omnibenevolent (all-good) God amid evidence of evil in the world.

Further, it might not match the nature of God as described by those who believe in Him. Specifically, Plantinga argues that free will provides a logically possible reason for an all-powerful, all-knowing, all-good God to allow the existence of moral evil.

God’s omnipotence does not imply logical contradiction, such as making a square circle. Editor's Note: There has been rising interest in the "problem of evil" in our comment boxes, and many atheist commenters requested a stronger engagement with the so-called "evidential" version of that argument.

So on Wednesday we featured a defense of the "evidential" version from atheist Brian Green Adams. Today, Catholic author Trent Horn offers a critique.

Omnipotence is the quality of having unlimited power. including omniscience, omnipresence, and omnibenevolence. The presence of all these properties in a single entity has given rise to considerable theological the question of why such a deity would permit the manifestation of evil.

Meanings. The term omnipotent has been used to . Isaiah affirms that God creates darkness and disaster.

The presence of evil as described in the article evil and omnipotence

It is not a creation of mankind, nor of fallen beings or initiativeblog.com Hebrew word here that is translated as "disaster" could also mean "wickedness", "hurt", "affliction" or "adversity". Jan 18,  · The following is originally published by Herescope and is republished here with permission: “Emmanuel” — God is with us!

By Pastor Larry DeBruyn. The mystery which has been hidden from the past ages and generations has now been manifested to His saints, to whom God willed to make known what is the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles, which is Christ in .

Evil - New World Encyclopedia